autogeekonline car wax, car care and auto detailing forum Autogeek on TV
car wax, car care and auto detailing forumAutogeekonline autogeekonline car wax, car care and auto detailing forum HomeForumBlogAutogeek.net StoreDetailing Classes with Mike PhillipsvbGarageGalleryDetailing How To'sDetailing How ToFacebookTwitterYouTube

Go Back   Auto Geek Online Auto Detailing Forum > Detailer's Library > Ask the Expert featuring Mike Phillips

Register FAQ Upload Photos Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

» Instagram
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-04-2013, 01:56 PM   #1
Member
 
KenVette57's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 53
Corvette Glass Top Scratches

Corvette Glass Top Scratches


I own a 2005 Corvette with a transparent removable top. I noticed yesterday that I have some fine scratches in the glass. I have no idea how to or even if it's possible to remove them. Am I screwed or can they be removed?

Help !!!

Thanks
KenVette57 is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2013, 03:07 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
jamesboyy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2,783
Try compounding them out with a combo like m105/m205 then inspect if the scratches still there use 2500 grit sandpaper followed by 3000 grit sandpaper then use a combo like m105/m205
jamesboyy is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2013, 03:14 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
swanicyouth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Limerick, PA
Posts: 7,594
I would first figure out if your top most layer is glass or some type of coating. If it's some type of coating, attempting to correct the glass will likely remove it. Who knows what GM puts on a glass roof.

There are several threads on AG how to correct glass with CeriGlass and CarPro rayon glass pads. Just search those terms and you will get step by step instructions. I don't think you will have much luck using paint polishes and foam polishing pads in removing defects from glass.
swanicyouth is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2013, 06:15 PM   #4
Member
 
KenVette57's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 53
Re: Glass Top Scratches

The top is made out of Lexan and I don't think there's any coating on it. I posed the same question on a Corvette Forum and the answer was wet sand 1000 grit, 1500 grit then 2000. polish and clear coat. Probably cheaper than a new on, $1,500.

Thanks for your reply, Ken
KenVette57 is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2013, 06:58 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
FUNX725's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 12,321
Re: Glass Top Scratches

Quote:
Originally Posted by KenVette57 View Post
I own a 2005 Corvette with a transparent removable top. I noticed yesterday that I have some fine scratches in the glass. I have no idea how to or even if it's possible to remove them. Am I screwed or can they be removed?

Help !!!

Thanks
Re: "Glass Top" Scratches

My 2007 has a removable Tinted Lexan Roof Panel.
Is yours actually glass...or also Lexan?

If it's like mine:
It does have a special ($$) protective UV-coating.

-When you try to polish out the scratch(es), you're likely to remove some of the tinted coat:
resulting in having even more obvious defect(s).

-Refinishing usually involves sanding the coating off the entire top; polishing the Lexan;
and then having the top re-cleared/re-tinted.
That's the only way I've ever seen them successfully repaired.

If you insist on polishing it...
-Use a plastic polish like Novus; and a very soft microfiber towel.
-Stay away from harsh abrasives!


However:
If it's really an honest to goodness glass-panel...
Then disregard this post of mine.



Bob
__________________
Be wary of the man who urges an action in which he himself incurs no risk~Joaquin de Setanti
FUNX725 is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2013, 07:33 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
swanicyouth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Limerick, PA
Posts: 7,594
From my knowledge Lexan is basically a type of softer plastic. You could live with the scratches. How bad are they? I've polished what I believe is a Lexan and it will scratch very easily no matter what. When I worked for Ford, we were told the clear plastic that covers where the speedo is is Lexan. It's slightly flexible, but doesn't shatter on impact. It's relatively easy to correct fine swirl like scratches, but if they are deep scratches it will require sanding.

If it were me, and the scratches bothered me, I would try a SMAT fine polish like Optimum Finish or Polish II. I've tried multiple "plastic polishes" on plastics and, well, they suck IMHO. Optimum just seems to work great on plastic and clear bra material for me. I think most plastic polishes are designed to be used by hand - good luck getting a defect free surface by hand. It can be done, but why ??? A machine is only as aggressive or mild as you make it.

Anyway, after it was corrected, I would OptiCoat it first. Why not clear coat?

1. OC is cheaper

2. OC won't have possible orange peel

3. OC can be done by yourself, so you will know it's done right.

4. OC will provide lifelong protection as well - you won't have to worry about waxing/sealing it.

5. OC will likely be harder than CC.

6. You can always polish off the OC and CC it later if you decide to do so for any reason.

7. OC can be polished and you can re-apply if scratches return.
swanicyouth is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2013, 07:05 AM   #7
Director of Training
 
Mike.Phillips@Autogeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stuart, Florida
Posts: 49,423
Re: Glass Top Scratches

Hey Ken,

I have people contact me about removing scratches out of Lexan all the time and now more than ever because I do boat detailing and work in the boat detailing world and a lot of boats have Lexan windows.

Here's the deal and this is just my own experience and in my life I've buffed out TONS of plastic.

I've never been able to remove scratches out of Lexan and leave a factory new, factory clear results.


To add to this...


The EXPECTATIONS most people have when trying to remove scratches, swirls or scuffs out of any plastic window and including Lexan is after the process they EXPECT the window to look FLAWLESS. Like brand new. Like nothing has ever happened to it.

That's nice.


I've never seen it done before, at least on the true Lexan plastic I've worked on.


The reason why it's difficult if not impossible to remove defects 100% and leave a clear window that looks like nothing ever happened is because Lexan is very hard, not soft.

Plexiglass is soft. Plexiglass is EASY to buff out. Lexan is hard.


I'd also say most people don't know how to tell the difference between Lexan, Plexiglas, Polycarbonate or Acrylic plastic windows.

So if someone were to chime in and say they can buff out "LEXAN" , I guess I would want to see this documented so we can all know it wasn't some other plastic but was in fact Lexan.

I have taken scratched up Lexan and buffed it and improved it but never to the point of restoring the type of results that people expect, that is so that it looks like nothing ever happened to it.


It's easy to have high expectations. It's hard to buff out Lexan.


For every Corvette owner that will ever read this into the future... be careful with your Lexan transparent tops.


Mike.Phillips@Autogeek is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2013, 07:24 AM   #8
Director of Training
 
Mike.Phillips@Autogeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stuart, Florida
Posts: 49,423
Re: Glass Top Scratches

Plexiglas seems to have gone the way of the Dodo Bird. Sad because it's so EASY to work on...

Plexiglas is what was used in the OLD days. The back window on a classic 1950's Corvette was Plexiglas and ANYONE could buff scratches out of this type of window and impress you.


Here's the window of the 1967 Starline Deville I use to own...






When I bought the boat the Plexiglas window was actually in GREAT shape for a boat that was 42 years old at the time the above picture was taken.


Here's how it looked after I buffed the boat out...





Here's a shot looking through the window out on the water...







Walgreen's Estate



Of course, always take care of antique Plexiglas when you get off the water...





Plexiglas is easy to work on. I LOVE working on Plexiglas.

I pass on Lexan, especially if the "item" is expensive because the expectations of the owner of the time are unrealistic as they tend to either confuse Lexan with all plastics are they just don't know anything about plastics.


PlastX uses a unique and rare abrasive mined in only one place on earth, (that I've been told), and you might give this a try although I couldn't get it to fix a Lexan Ferrari back window.

I also had "some" luck using M105, at the time M105 and the SMAT abrasive technology was JUST INTRODUCED, so it's possible some of the other new abrasive compounds and polishes on the market might work.

I'm talking about the abrasive technology introduced in these brands in the last few years...

Optimum
Sonax
Wolfgang Uber Compound
Menzerna FG400
Meguiar's
Rupes


I'm probably missing a few but the point is a LOT of very good abrasive technology has been introduced in the last few years and it could be some of these product could work but only testing will tell.

Detailing anything is easier than ever today simply because of abrasive technology.

It's the abrasive technology that is the most important aspect of undoing damage and creating a flawless finish on both CLEARcoat paints or clear plastics.

Some guys say technique is number #1 and I say their wrong. Technique is important but abrasive technology is number #1.

That's why I also type this all the time now days to mostly newbies joining the forum and wanting to learn how to detail cars...


Don't skimp on abrasive technology


That means don't skimp when it comes to choosing and buying your compounds and polishes. It is the abrasive technology or to drill down... the little tiny things that are going to abrade the surface that are pressed against the surface by the face of the pad that are all important.

And even more so when you consider how thin paint is...


Hope that helps...


Mike.Phillips@Autogeek is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2013, 07:29 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
swanicyouth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Limerick, PA
Posts: 7,594
Glass Top Scratches

I guess I was given wrong info what Lexan was. Sorry. I thought it was the type of plastic that is flexible that bug fairings and such are made from. Maybe that' is polycarbonate?

Nice boat.
swanicyouth is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2013, 07:51 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
tuscarora dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Etters PA
Posts: 4,990
Re: Glass Top Scratches

Quote:
Originally Posted by swanicyouth View Post
I guess I was given wrong info what Lexan was. Sorry. I thought it was the type of plastic that is flexible that bug fairings and such are made from. Maybe that' is polycarbonate?

Nice boat.
Lexan is just one company's trade name for polycarbonate. You're correct in your thinking.

Lexan=polycarbonate
tuscarora dave is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!twitter
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Initial Review: Pinnacle Black Label Diamond Wheel and Glass Coating Bigbull2984 Product Reviews 10 11-16-2013 10:54 AM
How to Polish Glass with Pinnacle GlassWork Water Spot Remover Mike.Phillips@Autogeek Ask the Expert featuring Mike Phillips 18 05-20-2013 01:27 PM
Ultimate Guide for Diamondite Kits! Nick@Autogeek Products Guides 8 01-18-2011 03:45 PM
Removing Vinyl Lettering From Glass Blackfire Off-Topic 9 08-09-2010 03:25 PM

» September 2014
S M T W T F S
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 1234
» Car Care Brands
Detailer's Pro Series Car Care Products
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.1

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©PBMA - Autogeekonline.net® All Rights Reserved.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55