autogeekonline car wax, car care and auto detailing forum Autogeek on TV
car wax, car care and auto detailing forumAutogeekonline autogeekonline car wax, car care and auto detailing forum HomeForumBlogAutogeek.net StoreDetailing Classes with Mike PhillipsGalleryDetailing How To's
 
Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Newbie Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like

    Beginner - Recommended Process

    I did considerable research (Google Searches) and finally went with what seems to be a traditional approach to remove orange peel (from a repair, Sikkens paint, Sikkens 2 part CC - two coats). As you can probably tell I'm a weekend warrior. I've been fixing cars, as a hobby, for years but body work has always eluded me. I've tried, but... I'm gaining and my repair looks pretty good but the final mile is being difficult. "Buffing it out" or "color sanding". Here is the process I used:

    1) Wet sand 1500 (or 2000)
    2) DA - Orange Sponge Pad - Maguiars 105 Ultra Cut
    3) polishing compound (haven't gotten here yet).

    I was not satisfied with the results (in my reasonably small test area). I know it's an art form and seems to take a lot of practice. I think my failure was that I didn't sand enough. The videos I've seen here discuss making sure there is a smooth, consistent "buffed" area (IE, no peaks and valleys). That said...

    When I wasn't satisfied I dug deeper and found these forums. Excellent. Thank you. I'll keep digging but, honestly the amount of information is staggering and complex. In today's world there seems to be significant movement away from wet sanding (step 1) and towards using a DA with "denim" or similar pad. This is where I'm confused.

    What compound is used with the "denim" (or similar backing plate)? Would the 105-Ultra Cut work or is that still Step 2? If it won't work is 105-Ultra Cut still a suitable Step 2?

    As much as possible I'd like to build on what I've already purchased but if that's not the right answer I'll do what I have to do.

    Thank you in advance. I apologize for questions which I know have been asked and answered but I've seen many conflicting answers and don't have the knowledge base to sort one out from another.

  2. #2
    Director of Training Mike Phillips's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    50,921
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Beginner - Recommended Process

    First - because this is your FIRST post,

    Welcome to AutogeekOnline!





    Quote Originally Posted by Just4Fun20 View Post

    I did considerable research (Google Searches) and finally went with what seems to be a traditional approach to remove orange peel (from a repair, Sikkens paint, Sikkens 2 part CC - two coats). As you can probably tell I'm a weekend warrior. I've been fixing cars, as a hobby, for years but body work has always eluded me. I've tried, but... I'm gaining and my repair looks pretty good but the final mile is being difficult. "Buffing it out" or "color sanding". Here is the process I used:

    1) Wet sand 1500 (or 2000)
    2) DA - Orange Sponge Pad - Maguiars 105 Ultra Cut
    3) polishing compound (haven't gotten here yet).

    I was not satisfied with the results (in my reasonably small test area).

    For what it's worth - I would use a wool pad on a rotary buffer to remove the sanding marks. Not a foam sponge on whatever tool you used?

    It always seems a fiber pads cuts better and more thoroughly to 100% remove the sanding marks permanently over a foam pad. Can a foam pad remove sanding marks - you bet, I demonstrated this last Friday night here,




    That was a demo of the ability and capability of a one-step cleaner/wax. In the real world, I would use a wool pad on a rotary to absolutely nail it. After removing the sanding marks NOW move onto foam pads and orbital polishers.




    Quote Originally Posted by Just4Fun20 View Post

    I know it's an art form and seems to take a lot of practice. I think my failure was that I didn't sand enough.

    The videos I've seen here discuss making sure there is a smooth, consistent "buffed" area (IE, no peaks and valleys).
    To remove 100% of orange peel you must sand until the paint is completely flat.



    Quote Originally Posted by Just4Fun20 View Post


    That said...

    When I wasn't satisfied I dug deeper and found these forums. Excellent. Thank you. I'll keep digging but, honestly the amount of information is staggering and complex.

    I like that,

    honestly the amount of information is staggering and complex

    That's the power of a forum over any other social media interface.




    Quote Originally Posted by Just4Fun20 View Post

    In today's world there seems to be significant movement away from wet sanding (step 1) and towards using a DA with "denim" or similar pad. This is where I'm confused.

    What compound is used with the "denim" (or similar backing plate)? Would the 105-Ultra Cut work or is that still Step 2? If it won't work is 105-Ultra Cut still a suitable Step 2?

    As much as possible I'd like to build on what I've already purchased but if that's not the right answer I'll do what I have to do.

    Thank you in advance. I apologize for questions which I know have been asked and answered but I've seen many conflicting answers and don't have the knowledge base to sort one out from another.

    Here's my original write-up for using Denim Pads to remove orange peel. Almost hard to believe this is going on 8 years old as I did the work and typed up the write-up in 2013!

    How to remove Orange Peel using a Porter Cable Dual Action Polisher






    Here's my take....

    First - after this initial use of denim pads to remove orange peel you won't find another such write-up.

    While the process does work - it's not for me because I possess the knowledge and skills to simply wetsand by hand and machine.

    As for what compound will work best with a Denim Pad? I've always suggested an old school rocks-in-a-bottle type compound. Most good compounds feel like Jergen's Hand Lotion - no chunks or chunky feel. I think a physical abrasives rolling around between a hard pad (denim pad), and a hard surface, (car paint), that these types of abrasives would work better to abrade the paint and remove orange peel.

    This is just a guess as after this old 2-dooy Chevy Truck - I moved on.


    I think you're on the right track to simply hand sand the paint and then remove your sanding marks and then polish-out.

    It takes practice to be good at this type of work. It takes experience to do it and make it look easy.


    If you live close to Stuart, Florida - bring your project by and I'll show you what I know.




  3. #3
    Director of Training Mike Phillips's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    50,921
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Beginner - Recommended Process

    Also just to note,

    This thread, that is your first post that started this thread, was in the "Moderation Queue".

    I found it this morning upon returning to work after the weekend was over, Monday, November 9th, and after inspecting it for Spam Links and not finding any, I approved it.

    Before it's approved, a "moderated post" is INVISIBLE to the public.

    And after approving it and thus making it VISIBLE - I then answered it, which also acted to bump it to the the top of "Most Recent Threads" where now others can see it.

    Not sure what it was placed into the Moderation Queue? So apologies ahead of time.



  4. #4
    Director of Training Mike Phillips's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    50,921
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Beginner - Recommended Process

    And for my own reference and others too, here's the link to your other thread on what I'm assuming is the same project.


    Beginner - Burn Through




  5. #5
    Newbie Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Beginner - Recommended Process

    Thank you Mike.

    I'll digest all of this. I'd already seen the green Chevy Truck video but will watch them all again. Bottom line is you're happiest with 1) "traditional" wet sand, 2) remove scratches, 3) polish (or whatever is the right terminology) procedures. The new (other forums, google searches) or newer "denim" pad or something similar to replace the "wet sanding" is not to your liking. Thanks for the advice. After viewing the videos I think I'll 1) Hit it with 2000 wet again, 2) Get a wool pad and/or use my "sponge", on a DA (about 5 inches), with Meguiar's Ultra-Cut 105, then 3) some sort of polishing compound.

    I'm good for now. I'm working on a door panel (RV "basement" door) so easily fixed in a pinch.

    We get to Florida fairly often. Not at the moment and not this winter although we'll see what happens. I may just take you up on swinging by Stuart.

    Regards. Be well and thanks again.

Similar Threads

  1. Recommended starter, combo kit for beginner
    By ScottStoef in forum Hot topics & Frequently Asked Questions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-11-2017, 09:22 AM
  2. Recommended AIO
    By SalFoges in forum Product Reviews
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-23-2012, 05:55 PM
  3. No Wax Recommended ????
    By rotzilla in forum Ask Mike Phillips your detailing questions!
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 01-31-2012, 05:50 PM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-19-2011, 06:48 PM
  5. 4*. Which products recommended to try?
    By supercharged in forum Auto Detailing 101
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-13-2006, 02:16 PM

Members who have read this thread: 10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» October 2021

S M T W T F S
2627282930 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 123456