autogeekonline car wax, car care and auto detailing forum Autogeek on TV
car wax, car care and auto detailing forumAutogeekonline autogeekonline car wax, car care and auto detailing forum HomeForumBlogAutogeek.net StoreDetailing Classes with Mike PhillipsGalleryDetailing How To's
 

» Detailing Classes

New Dates Available for the Autogeek Roadshow!
Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 69
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    30
    Post Thanks / Like

    Help: Rotary Buffer Use

    I really want to learn how to use rotary buffers and am looking at buying one. My friend has a beater vehicle and has agreed to let me learn on it. I know quite a few of you use rotary buffers and was wanting some input surrounding their use. Are they difficult to operate? Are the results significantly better in comparison to those derived from DA machines? Are polishing times cut in half? How long does it normally take to become proficient with them? I'm particularly worried about burning the paint on the vehicles countours, such as on corners; what can be done to prevent this? Any tips, techniques, opinions, etc would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Senior Member justin_murphy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Blue Ridge GA (The Mtns.)
    Posts
    2,852
    Post Thanks / Like
    This is the best guide I've found. I too am in the process of learning the rotary.

    A Guide To Rotary Polishing - Detailing World

    Here's another.......
    "Polish until the residue goes clear" - Pictorial Explanation - Detailing World
    Last edited by justin_murphy; 12-01-2007 at 02:21 AM.
    Formerly "justin30513"

    www.clean4udetailing.com


  3. #3
    SELF BANNED TOGWT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    716
    Post Thanks / Like
    Rotary common mistakes and usage tips -
    • Nearly every rotary on the market today uses a 5/8 - inch / 11pi arbour spindle for backing plates. I would recommend getting a hook and loop (Velcro™) backing plate Clean your pads before you use them, or start out with a new pad; use a soft toothbrush for foam, and a spur for wool. As a general rule, the more aggressive the polish, the more often you'll need to clean out your pads. I clean out my pad after every panel when compounding.

    • Diminishing abrasives- you need to allow the abrasives to break down (become progressively smaller) to create a great finish or you may impart surface marring, holograms or worse. When a polish "flashes" from a liquid paste to a light semi-dry haze; its colour changes from the polish colour to almost transparent; the polish has then broken down and is ready for removal. It is important to know when a polish has broken down because if you take it too far you (dry polishing) will re-introduce surface marring. Conversely if you don’t work diminishing abrasives sufficiently they will cause surface marring; this is due to the size of the abrasive and its cutting ability, once an abrasive has broken down it becomes very fine and will burnish the surface as opposed to cutting it

    • Ensure a ‘wet’ polishing film is always present between your pad and the surface. Swirls are usually caused by using an aggressive polish without breaking down the diminishing abrasives properly, or you may have used too much polish or it may have dried. To remove spritz the pad with distilled water (un-primed pads can cause marring) do not add further polish) and re-polish using the polish left on the pad.

    • Edge (spin off) – a light sensitive approach is essential, using only the weight of the machine, on vertical panels just enough pressure to maintain contact with the surface (without applied pressure) tilt the contact edge of the pad a few degrees so that only the leading edge of the pad is in contact with the paint surface. A smaller pad surface contact area will increase friction heat so adjust machine speed accordingly

    • Knowing when a polish is fully broken down comes with experience but a good yard stick is when the polish has gone clear and is very easy to wipe off. Holograms or micro marring are again imparted due to polish that hasn’t been properly broken down or too high speeds. Following the advice above or below should cure these.

    • ‘Buffer hop’ is when the rotary jumps across the paints surface usually due to insufficient polish/lubrication and as the foam pad grips the paint it jumps. Try spreading the polish more evenly across the pad, add more polish, distilled water or quick detailer (QD) This can also be caused by a bogged down pad – clean / spur / replace pads often.

    • For the neophyte user I would suggest starting out by using a smaller pad, 6.5 – inch I have even found 4- inch pads to be very useful for polishing small tight spaces and smaller panels.

    • High RPM i.e. >1700 will cause high surface temperatures (should be limited to 1000F / 300 C)

    • 1150F / 450 C < will damage clear coat to the point were it requires repainting.

    • The HS Rotary requires no more pressure than that required to ‘hold’ it on the paint surface

    • Always tape pinstripes; It doesn't take much to wipe them right off the paint, or thin them out

    • Inspect your work under full sun (or use a 3M Sun Gun®) Holograms, fine marring hooks, etc. are very difficult to see under man made light. There's nothing more frustrating than having to strip off your LSP and re-do.

    • Remove all polish residue and oils before applying your LSP. This is a general rule of thumb for best results across all product lines, and you will notice an overall improvement in the clarity, gloss, and overall 'look' of your finish.

    • If you're new to rotary polishing start off by only using finishing pads and Do Not exceed
    1500 RPM < faster is not better and it may cause you problems. Let the rotary do the work, you'll be surprised at what you can correct with a finishing pad and a mildly abrasive polish.

    • When you shut down the machine never let the pad stop on the surface. Bring the machine to the closest edge of the panel and slowly let it roll off with an angle facing inward to the panel, this will help prevent marring.

    • One of the biggest problems when using a rotary is product sling, however when using highly lubricated polishes splatter its a sign that you’ve used too much polish or you have turned the speed up to too fast, too soon. No matter how much you try and avoid it you’re still going to see it. When polishing cover areas you don’t want covered in product and mask off trim with blue painter’s tape if necessary and cover windshields or other vehicle parts with towels. Be careful around mouldings, antennas (aerial’s to us Brits ) and other trim pieces

  4. #4
    SELF BANNED ASPHALT ROCKET's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    2,872
    Post Thanks / Like
    Start off on a slow speed and do not use much pressure. This way you can start to judge your work. Just continue to go up in speed and a little pressure. I would go around and tape the edges to avoid burning them. Also find a car that you can actually see what it takes to burn the paint. Depending on the type of pad, foam or wool, you will need to see what it will take you as far as your technique goes to see how long it takes to burn the paint. Make sure you go with the curves in the body and also when you get to an edge ease up on the pressure and start bring the pad of the paint in a gradual movement. If I think of anything else I will add. Might have to go run the buffer over the hood to add to this. If you have any other question I will be more than happy to answer. All I use is a rotary.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jimmie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Upper Desert, CA
    Posts
    4,333
    Post Thanks / Like
    's from everyone. Thank you guys for sharing. Very educational.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,258
    Post Thanks / Like
    Use a smaller pad so you can control it easier. Handling a rotary is nothing like handling a PC or UDM. I like to use 5.5" pads.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Showroom Shine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus,Ohio
    Posts
    860
    Post Thanks / Like
    I do okay with the rotory. That's all I ever knew about until I joined AG and you guys and gals started talking about a PC! DUH! Now I just purchased a FLEX. Probably won't get here until after Christmas! I'll still use my rotory! I'm use to it!

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    30
    Post Thanks / Like
    I appreciate all of the helpful input provided. I initially expected a number of persons to try and steer me away from stepping up to the rotary. All of the input has been extremely helpful and has given me enough confidence to give the rotary a try; I ordered a Makita today. I'm sure I will have additional questions once it arrives and will probably resort to your guys expertise in the future. If anyone else has any additional information, please continue posting it on this thread. I will continue referring to this until and when the buffer arrives.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Pats300zx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Middletown, Del
    Posts
    5,104
    Post Thanks / Like
    I just ordered the Makita 9227 as well. I have been practicing on several beater cars and am looking forward to using it when I get more confidence on some clients cars. It will certainly make details faster and take the finish to a different level.
    Only Z Best Detailing-Automotive Concours Detailing Services
    http://ozbdetailing.com
    https://www.facebook.com/ozbautodetailing

  10. #10
    SELF BANNED Mr Dream Machines's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    259
    Post Thanks / Like
    9227 is my weapon of choice.

    Keep the pad absolutely flat on the paint at all times, don't tilt it
    Use 4 inch pads on funny angled surfaces, especially rear bumpers
    You don't want the pad to be big enough to do the panel but not burn the bottom of doors or top of bumpers

    Therefore 5.5 inch pads are better than 6.5 to 8 inch on some
    Judge every panel individually, don't look at a few panels and say "right, this will fix it"
    Each panel has been treated differently to another, so refinish each panel completely before doing the next.

    Takes longer but results are better. I hate going around a car three to five times

Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Rotary buffer
    By Gcleov in forum Ask Mike Phillips your detailing questions!
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-20-2016, 02:35 PM
  2. Rotary Buffer
    By HoldenFlinner48 in forum Auto Detailing 101
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 08-03-2015, 02:12 PM
  3. How to use a rotary buffer
    By Mike Phillips in forum How to articles by Mike Phillips
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 02-26-2015, 09:39 AM
  4. 3M Rotary Buffer
    By jgraham37128 in forum Auto Detailing 101
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-01-2014, 11:55 AM
  5. Rotary Buffer
    By Sol on fire in forum Ask Mike Phillips your detailing questions!
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 12-26-2010, 12:03 AM

Members who have read this thread: 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» September 2019

S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 12345