autogeekonline car wax, car care and auto detailing forum Autogeek on TV
car wax, car care and auto detailing forumAutogeekonline autogeekonline car wax, car care and auto detailing forum HomeForumBlogAutogeek.net StoreDetailing Classes with Mike PhillipsGalleryDetailing How To's
 

» Detailing Classes

New Dates Available for the Autogeek Roadshow!
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 40
  1. #1
    Senior Member oneheadlite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Andover, MN
    Posts
    992
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    Hey gang.

    I'm in process of building an all wood platform bed frame. Super simple, isn't going to be visible. I'm using Douglas Fir 2x4's for main load bearing structure with Douglas Fir 2x6's as finishing boards around the outside. (I can put up a blueprint if it matters). The support slats will be 1x4 poplar.

    So, my question is: While the frame isn't visible, nor was it hugely expensive, I do want it to stay solid/quiet. Originally I was planning on leaving the wood bare, but from what I've been reading it seems like I should do something to seal the boards to prevent splitting/warping/etc.

    What would be recommended? It's winter here and I'd be doing it in the garage, so that's definitely a factor. Again, doesn't need to be anything fancy as it'll be hidden under a bed skirt.

    Or, do I just skip it since being in a climate controlled upstairs bedroom humidity/temperature changes will be at a minimum? At the very least I'll be going over it with a sander to smooth it out.

  2. Likes dgage liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member Rsurfer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    12,878
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    Steel bed frames are so cheap. Probably cheeper than the cost of wood. I can understand building a nice head board out of wood. Is there a reason you want to do this?

  4. Likes dgage liked this post
  5. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    187
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    Wood will definitely move based on humidity regardless of finish unless you were somehow able to encapsulate completely, which would require an epoxy-like finish. And epoxy won't cure when cold. As a matter of fact, most finishes won't cure in the cold so you may need to wait until the spring.

    So we need to realize your platform structure will move, more so across the width than length. So if you're looking for quiet, it really depends on how you plan to attach the joints to handle that wood movement. That is also a way to prevent splitting. So you may want to share your blueprint but more importantly, how you plan to join the wood at the corners, etc. And what type of glue you plan to use.

    Also, your bed will get a shock after being built in the cold garage and then brought into a climate controlled environment so you'll get the most wood movement at that time. This is why wood flooring companies deliver wood several days to a week before they actually plan to install the floor so the wood can adjust to the environment before being installed.

  6. Likes oneheadlite liked this post
  7. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    187
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    Quote Originally Posted by Rsurfer View Post
    Steel bed frames are so cheap. Probably cheeper than the cost of wood. I can understand building a nice head board out of wood. Is there a reason you want to do this?
    I agree with this one. Much easier. And then you really don't have to worry about wood movement. Steel joints don't move a different rates like wood joints often do.

  8. #5
    Senior Member 2black1s's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    696
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    I don't think you have anything to worry about with a simple 2x4 bedframe.

    Sure, wood "moves" with temp and humidity changes, but the amount of movement is typically only a problem when working with precise and tight joints in "fine" woodworks.

    Your bedframe doesn't sound like it fits that description.

    The amount of movement in Doug Fir 2x4s relative to temp/humidity changes can be measured in thousandths of an inch and I just don't see that as an issue worth worrying about for your project.

    Too prove this point, I just took a Doug Fir 2x4, cut off a 1-inch long piece and measured it with calipers in the 3 1/2 direction. It measured 3.432". Then I soaked the piece in a bucket of water for 15 minutes and remeasured... 3.439". In this extreme experiment there was only .007" movement. That amount of wood "movement" is simply not an issue for your project.

    One suggestion I would give you is to buy Kiln-Dried 2x4s. I wouldn't use "Green" 2x4s. Green 2x4s are more likely to twist and warp than Kiln-Dried 2x4s as they do dry out.

    Sealing the boards with some type of finish, or oil, is your call, but from a structural perspective I don't see it as necessary.

  9. Thanks oneheadlite thanked for this post
    Likes oneheadlite liked this post
  10. #6
    Senior Member oneheadlite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Andover, MN
    Posts
    992
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    Quote Originally Posted by Rsurfer View Post
    Steel bed frames are so cheap. Probably cheeper than the cost of wood. I can understand building a nice head board out of wood. Is there a reason you want to do this?
    Main reason is noise. Right now we have a regular mattress + box spring on a steel frame. Our Great Dane mixes have figured out they can accelerate our wake ups on weekends by leaning on the bed and shaking us around. Drives me crazy.

    The mattress I'm getting has recommendations of support slats with spacing of about 3", so this led me to looking at wood frames. I'll confess I didn't spend much time looking at steel frames as I had low faith in their build quality from what I was seeing online.

    After looking at a lot of wood frames, I was left feeling like it wouldn't be hard to build something sturdier for less money.

    Also, like so many things - I kinda wanna try it just because I can. I made planter boxes for my wife that turned out quite well, so looking forward to doing something more precise. Wood's already purchased, so the ball's rolling. Total investment thus far is so low if I have to do a version 2 I won't be heartbroken, especially since half of the cost was the slats which can get reused no matter what.

    Quote Originally Posted by dgage View Post
    Wood will definitely move based on humidity regardless of finish unless you were somehow able to encapsulate completely, which would require an epoxy-like finish. And epoxy won't cure when cold. As a matter of fact, most finishes won't cure in the cold so you may need to wait until the spring.

    So we need to realize your platform structure will move, more so across the width than length. So if you're looking for quiet, it really depends on how you plan to attach the joints to handle that wood movement. That is also a way to prevent splitting. So you may want to share your blueprint but more importantly, how you plan to join the wood at the corners, etc. And what type of glue you plan to use.

    Also, your bed will get a shock after being built in the cold garage and then brought into a climate controlled environment so you'll get the most wood movement at that time. This is why wood flooring companies deliver wood several days to a week before they actually plan to install the floor so the wood can adjust to the environment before being installed.
    Thank you for your post.

    I should have added - I'll be cutting the wood at work (stable 65 degrees), then bringing it home to assemble in the basement. I just don't want to do any chemical work in the house.

    I'm familiar with how wood needs to be sealed on all sides, any kind of finish on our deck has been a losing battle since we've moved in for that reason (plus it was timing out when we got there anyway). I was also wondering if the pieces could be individually finished then assembled, but wasn't sure how that would work with gluing.

    I'm open for glue suggestions.

    Corner joints will be pocket screws, still debating fastening method for support structure to outer rails. Thinking simple screw straight in at 90°. Center cross support will be 2x6, corners will be 45° 2x6's to pull the legs in from the corners 6". Feet (6 total) will be 6.5" tall 4x4's with hardwood dowels inserted across the grain to ensure the hardware has something good to grab onto.

    I'll get a picture up for clarity's sake after work.

  11. #7
    Senior Member oneheadlite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Andover, MN
    Posts
    992
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    2black1s - Thanks for the info!

    Quote Originally Posted by 2black1s View Post
    ...
    One suggestion I would give you is to buy Kiln-Dried 2x4s. I wouldn't use "Green" 2x4s. Green 2x4s are more likely to twist and warp than Kiln-Dried 2x4s as they do dry out.
    I don't believe what I got is green. The Douglas Fir I picked up is actually stud lumber; it's got KD marked on it, not sure if that stands for Kiln Dried.

  12. #8
    Senior Member 2black1s's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    696
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    Glue suggestion for this kind of work... Loctite PL Premium (3x Stronger) Construction Adhesive.

    Edit: Yes, KD is the marking for Kiln-Dried.

  13. Thanks oneheadlite thanked for this post
    Likes oneheadlite liked this post
  14. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    187
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    I actually built one of these in the past and it was STRONG. When we moved, we weren't taking it with us as we bought new adjustable beds. My friend tried to break it at the joint and it broke the wood along the grain. I agree to use PL Premium 3X as that will hold better since the end of wood doesn't suck up wood glue as on the long edge. I would also add metal L-braces for two reasons. The first is strength though really that isn't needed once the glue dries. The second is as clamps to hold the wood while the glue dries. And I just left mine long term. And make sure to use a drill in the wood so you don't split it.

    Another option to use for joints is a Kreg Jig HD, which is a pocket hole joinery system for 2x materials. Use with the glue but would allow you to forgo clamping or L-brackets.

  15. Likes oneheadlite, PaulMys liked this post
  16. #10
    Senior Member oneheadlite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Andover, MN
    Posts
    992
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Question for our in-house woodworker peeps

    Quote Originally Posted by dgage View Post
    I actually built one of these in the past and it was STRONG. When we moved, we weren't taking it with us as we bought new adjustable beds. My friend tried to break it at the joint and it broke the wood along the grain. I agree to use PL Premium 3X as that will hold better since the end of wood doesn't suck up wood glue as on the long edge. I would also add metal L-braces for two reasons. The first is strength though really that isn't needed once the glue dries. The second is as clamps to hold the wood while the glue dries. And I just left mine long term. And make sure to use a drill in the wood so you don't split it.

    Another option to use for joints is a Kreg Jig HD, which is a pocket hole joinery system for 2x materials. Use with the glue but would allow you to forgo clamping or L-brackets.
    Good to get a second vote for the same glue.

    I'll actually be using a Kreg Jig/Kreg Screws for the corners, I should have mentioned that when I said pocket holes.

    All their literature says the bottom part of the screw self taps after you've drilled the pocket hole; my OCD still wants to pre-drill like you mention. I'll give them benefit of the doubt and give it a go.

    Separate question - Do you think using the Kreg Screws 90° into the wood (I'd pre-drill for this part) would be fine for attaching the 2x4's to the outer 2x6's? Wasn't sure what the best hardware would be for that application; seems like with the smooth upper shank that would be a safe way to go.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. NZ to Mickies House to Autogeek Open House to Space & Back ...
    By Aaryn NZ in forum Auto Detailing 101
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 01-21-2020, 04:43 AM
  2. Replies: 22
    Last Post: 01-23-2016, 12:19 PM
  3. Hey Atlanta area peeps!!!
    By Mike Honcho in forum Auto Detailing 101
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-13-2015, 04:54 AM
  4. Group AutoGeek PEEPS Picture?
    By Bacon in forum Off-Topic
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-19-2011, 06:20 PM
  5. sry peeps i just need a vent
    By guess23959 in forum Off-Topic
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-04-2011, 07:33 PM

Members who have read this thread: 58

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» January 2021

S M T W T F S
2728293031 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 123456