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  1. #1
    Member surajprasade's Avatar
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    Dual action or rotary polisher

    Hi Mike,
    This is my first question on forum. I work alone as a detailer. It take 7 hours to me to detail a car. So in order to work fast should I go for a dual action polisher or rotary polisher?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Rsurfer's Avatar
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    Re: Dual action or rotary polisher

    What are you using now?
    Quote Originally Posted by surajprasade View Post
    Hi Mike,
    This is my first question on forum. I work alone as a detailer. It take 7 hours to me to detail a car. So in order to work fast should I go for a dual action polisher or rotary polisher?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Dugdug's Avatar
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    Re: Dual action or rotary polisher

    Some people like DA because it's safe and easy. Rotary requires a lot of practice and can cause damage easily if you're not a pro. I have never used a rotary, but a lot of members here have. From what I gather, they prefer the DA for the most part.

    I love my GG DA. But to answer your question, before I invested in a polisher, I did a lot of reading in here and on other sites before I purchased a polisher. The rotary is faster, but personally I still prefer my DA because it's a lot safer.

  4. #4
    Senior Member BobbyG's Avatar
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    Re: Dual action or rotary polisher

    To Autogeek Online!

    If you're just starting out the dual action polisher is the easiest to master and chances of damaging the paint is close to impossible but I have seen it done.

    How to choose the right polisher for your detailing project




    Here's some great information that will help you if you need it.


    BobbyG - 2004 Millennium Yellow Z06 Corvette

  5. #5
    Senior Member DaGonz's Avatar
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    Re: Dual action or rotary polisher

    I'll echo Bobby G...
    I have a Porter Cable DA polisher, a Griot's 3" DA as well as a rotary.. I prefer the DA's and use them 99.99% of the time.
    2007 Ford Edge SEL AWD 2006 Ford Mustang GT 2009 Ford F-150 XLT Supercab 4x4

  6. #6
    Senior Member courtdale's Avatar
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    Re: Dual action or rotary polisher

    With zero experience, I started with a Rotary (Makita). I've used the harshest products, (Meg 105 and LC heaviest pad - yellow), and never damaged the paint. If anything, the correction was too gentle each time.

    In my experience so far as long as you exercise a little caution and use common sense, rotaries are no where near as scary as many make them out to be. 3 details later and I am totally comfortable with my Makita.

  7. #7
    Member Mike@DistinctImage's Avatar
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    Re: Dual action or rotary polisher

    Hi surajprasade

    So far I only use a DA on jobs with Meg's DA microfiber system, which (in most cases) has saved me the upgrade to a rotary polisher. It works wonderfully on most paint types except the super hard german clearcoats which require a second pass and even slower arm speed.

    I think the professional industry is starting to move away from the rotary for defect removal as technologies for DA polishers from a few manufacturers are changing the game for everyone I have read articles by some of the pro detailers that have stopped using the rotary altogether for correction work, but it still has its place in finishing polishing that a DA still struggles to contend with IMO.

    As courtdale says caution and common sense is the best approach to take. I have burnt through paint on a test panel with a DA, M105 and an aggressive pad (to test the limits) and while the DA is a really safe tool, if not used correctly can do some damage all the same.

    I for one am scared of rotary polishers, but will eventually add one to my arsenal
    Mike Honeyman
    Distinct Image Detailing
    www.distinctimagedetailing.co.za

  8. #8
    Member littleblackcar's Avatar
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    Your favorite DA?

    I want to get a DA for light work on a new car. Which one is "the best"?

  9. #9
    Senior Member shoeless89's Avatar
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    Re: Dual action or rotary polisher

    I would go with a DA, its hard to finish down perfectly with a rotary. So even if you use a rotary, a lot of the time you'll end up using to DA to finish out.
    Rule 62: Don't take yourself to d*mn seriously
    Cincinnati, OH
    Shawn

  10. #10
    Senior Member BobbyG's Avatar
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    Re: Your favorite DA?

    Quote Originally Posted by littleblackcar View Post
    I want to get a DA for light work on a new car. Which one is "the best"?
    There are two classes of dual action polishers discussed here, the Flex 3401 and the Porter Cable style.

    Flex 3401

    The Flex is in a class of its own and while it's considered by many to the the best dual action polisher on the market it's built like a tank and is somewhat pricey.

    Porter Cable style

    These are probably more the type your looking for but make no mistake, these are quality machines capable of correcting some of the most stubborn finish defects.

    • Porter Cable
    • Griot's
    • Meguiar's

    Porter Cable wrote the book on these polishers long before the other two were even through of.

    The first generation Porter Cable 7424 was available to customers 12 years prior to Meguiar's announcing they were entering the market with them offering their G110 polisher in 2006. I'm not sure when Griot's began offering their polisher...

    The Porter Cable 7424 basically set the standard which made many if the features between the 3 interchangeable.

    To the best of my knowledge Porter Cable is the only company listed above that designs and manufactures their power tools. Griot's and Meguiar's are not in the power tool manufacturing business therefore contract their orders and my guess to the lowest bidder.

    Griot's has the most powerful motor among the three. The Porter Cable 7424xp is the second generation polisher which outsells the others combined.

    Meguiar's falls into the same realm as Griot's in regard to manufacturing power tools.

    Pad Size

    The Porter Cable style polishes are right at home with a 5" backing plate and using 5 1/2" foam pads, not the 6 1/2 diameter pads typically offered.

    Pads & Friction

    The size or surface area does not directly affect the frictional force between two surfaces until downward force or pressure is applied. Reducing the pad size will only improve the mechanical efficiency of the machine.

    The motor of your polisher produces some amount of power. The larger the pad surface area the harder the motor must work. Now, most will say "it's only 1 extra inch", but when it comes to surface area and friction your really talking about an additional 10 square inches. Now take a look at the difference between the 5 1/2", 6 1/2" and 7" pad...........Size does matter!

    • Surface Area - 5 1/2 pad = 23.75 in˛
    • Surface Area - 6 1/2 pad = 33.18 in˛
    • Surface Area - 7 pad = 38.484 in˛

    There is a direct relationship between the pad surface area and the polishers ability to transfer adequate power to the pad improving it's overall performance.

    My Choice: The Porter Cable 7424xp

    BobbyG - 2004 Millennium Yellow Z06 Corvette

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