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lane5515
03-03-2016, 11:10 AM
I would like your opinion on whether or not the Rupes pads should be primed before polishing or simply start with 3-4 drops of product. I will soon be trying the UHS pads for the first time so your feedback is appreciated.

The Guz
03-03-2016, 12:30 PM
See some of these posts. There is some good info

http://www.autogeekonline.net/forum/rupes-bigfoot-oribital-polishers/94740-hard-paints-rupes-zephir-gloss-rupes-diamond-gloss-rupes-uhs.html#post1289763

http://www.autogeekonline.net/forum/rupes-bigfoot-oribital-polishers/96406-rupes-bigfoot-mk-ii-vs-ferrari-daytona.html

RaskyR1
03-03-2016, 12:31 PM
Depends on the polish being used

Zubair
03-03-2016, 12:53 PM
http://www.autogeekonline.net/forum/rupes-bigfoot-oribital-polishers/96188-rupes-pad-compound-recommendation-charts.html

lane5515
03-03-2016, 07:31 PM
Thanks for the replies. When I searched Rupes Pads I got over 500 post hits and I didn't read all of them close enough. If you have found any other methods that work well please let me know.

adolfitovr6
05-17-2016, 02:05 PM
on my experience foam rupes pads and meguiars compounds like 105, 101, 205, they work better with out primed and also noticed low dust.

WRAPT C5Z06
05-17-2016, 02:27 PM
Rupes says to avoid solvent based polishes with their pads, FYI

idriveblackcars
05-17-2016, 06:59 PM
When I do use Rupes foam I only use them with Rupes liquids. And I do prime the pad (not as saturated as priming a microfiber)and add 4 small drops. Then 3 drops after that until I change pads.

dlc95
05-17-2016, 08:26 PM
When I do use Rupes foam I only use them with Rupes liquids. And I do prime the pad (not as saturated as priming a microfiber)and add 4 small drops. Then 3 drops after that until I change pads.

Same here.

manateemark
05-18-2016, 07:23 AM
I think it also needs to be stated what size pad you are using. As on the 100mm pads I use 2 drops then 1 till I switch, but I on the 170mm pads I'll use like 5-6 drops, and then 3 till I switch.

mc2hill
05-18-2016, 09:57 AM
If I remember the conversation with Todd or Dylan correctly the answer is "yes". The reason - they build their pads from one piece of foam, and the priming allows the 'face' (lower few mm's of the pad) to soften up, and leave the 'top' of the pad stiff (to properly transfer the movement to the pad). Other companies build their long-throw pads from 2 different materials to accomplish the same effect.

postaltwo
05-18-2016, 06:11 PM
I wouldn't be suprised if they are not compatible with each other . I think rupes gets irratated with ppl modifing their tools . I think in their "perfect world " senerio everyone would just use the system as intended . With backing plate pad and Polish all oem rupes

Todd@RUPES
05-21-2016, 06:01 AM
I wouldn't be suprised if they are not compatible with each other . I think rupes gets irratated with ppl modifing their tools . I think in their "perfect world " senerio everyone would just use the system as intended . With backing plate pad and Polish all oem rupes

RUPES' corporate philosophy has been, since the 1940s, to deliver engineered systems to the customer. With the BigFoot Project, this philosophy was necessary because during the development process RUPES found out why no other tool manufacturer had attempted to build a very large throw orbital polisher.

Random Orbital Polishers have, pre-BigFoot, suffered from two primary problems:
1) Lack of polishing speed - it took a long time to accomplish what a rotary could do quickly.
2) High levels of vibration.

By increasing the stroke length (which affects the distance traveled by RPM), it was possible to increase the speed at which to tools removed material. However, with this increased power, the vibration that was annoying in a short-stroke tool became stressful to every other component: the tool, the pads, the velcro, etc...

In order to solve the vibration, RUPES developed a very unique counter balance weight. This counterweight is so effective that pretty much every Chinese-built copy cat ripped it off. The original Chinese built tools used the wrong material because they frankly didn't understand what they were doing. The better Chinese built tools use a counterweight that is such a copy that you could literally unbolt ours and swap in theirs.

As a tool manufacturer (instead of a reseller of a private label) we have to be very precise in our recommendations. Since we now had a counterweight that could balance the extreme throw of the tool, we had to marry it to a pad weight that would complete the vibration canceling. This was the beginning of the foam pad project which was quite an undertaking for a tool manufacturer.

Once the pads weights and design were finalized, RUPES had to find foam formulas that were both stiff enough to transfer the energy of a large-orbit tool to the paint without overheating and excessive wear. Once this was accomplished we had to develop compounds that would soften the first few mm of the foam to prevent scouring while still transferring the energy. They also couldn't absorb into the foam otherwise the weight balance would be thrown off.

When BigFoot tools were first introduced into the US market, there was a lot of problems with other manufacturers' pads delaminating or falling apart. The aftermarket hadn't developed the technology for the tools and it would be a few years until we saw viable alternatives.

Do we get annoyed when people don't use our system? Of course not! We are thrilled that somebody loves the tools enough to experiment and adapt to it. However, as the manufacturer, innovator, and developer of such technologies we do understand some of the shortcomings that other products may create. Large-throw random orbital polishers are precision tools.

Case in point: Many people swap to a smaller backing plate on the 21mm throw tools, which we know will accelerate tool wear and increase vibration on any large-throw orbital tool. Despite the fact that many people have done this, you don't see posts over social media about RUPES tools snapping the spindle or bearing failures. Despite our tools' proven track record, we still feel it our responsibility to caution against this.

The aftermarket has gotten up to speed, at least pad wise, to the BigFoot technology. A lot of the newer pads copy our profile and some are even copying our foam formulas directly. There have been and will continue to be a lot of great and sophisticated compound manufacturers. However, BigFoot was always developed as a system - not just a series of tools - so it is only natural that if you talk to us (RUPES) about it we will recommend that pads, compounds, and backing plates we developed through the engineering process.

And just like the Mark II version of the 15 and 21, our development never stops. :)

Todd@RUPES
05-21-2016, 06:06 AM
To answer the original question: If you are using our compounds with our pads, then yes we recommend the following priming procedure (it is most important with the blue foam and UHS foam to prevent sling and increase the polishing comfort).

1) On a 7-inch/180mm foam apply 5 or 6 pea-sized drops around the outer 1/3 circumference of the pad. Use 4 to 5 pea-sized drops for 6-inch/150mm foam pads and 4 drops for the 4-inch/100mm pads. For the Nano-sized pads, use a drop. For microfiber, lightly coat the surface of the fiber with the product.

2) Using firm (not hard or excessive pressure), polish a small section for approximately 30 seconds on speed three. This will spread the polish over the face of the foam and allow for reaction between the compound and the unique resin in our pads' formulas. The result should be that the first few mm of foam will soften to prevent sling and scratching.

3) After 30 seconds (or so - on cold panels I may bump the speed to 4 and continue for another 10 seconds) wipe the area clean.

4) Reload pads using 2 to 3 drops for larger pads and 1 to 2 drops for smaller pads. Polish on speed 3 to 4 (Mark II) or 4-6 (ES tool).

postaltwo
05-21-2016, 07:33 AM
Todd . What is the rupes recommended method of cleaning spent product and residue from pads in between panels ?