PDA

View Full Version : BF One Step removal



Dr Oldz
04-07-2019, 09:10 PM
When I use One Step, I typically polish a panel or two then remove after product has dried on the surface. I feel this allows the sealant within to bond to the paint. Removal is always a breeze.

Today I went around the whole vehicle and then removed the product. Some areas were appx 6 hours of drying. After sitting so long, I used compressed air to blow the vehicle off quickly just incase any dust fell on the vehicle. After that, I removed with a quality MF and removal was so easy. Basically the towels weight was removing the left over residue and it left a super slick feeling behind.

So fo any future users: Donít be afraid to let the product sit. I think removal became even easier. I do suggest if you do let it sit to blow off, just incase any particulates landed on the paint. You donít want to grind them in while removing One Step.

Mike Phillips
04-08-2019, 05:15 AM
When I use One Step, I typically polish a panel or two then remove after product has dried on the surface. I feel this allows the sealant within to bond to the paint. Removal is always a breeze.

Today I went around the whole vehicle and then removed the product. Some areas were appx 6 hours of drying. After sitting so long, I used compressed air to blow the vehicle off quickly just incase any dust fell on the vehicle. After that, I removed with a quality MF and removal was so easy. Basically the towels weight was removing the left over residue and it left a super slick feeling behind.

So fo any future users: Don’t be afraid to let the product sit. I think removal became even easier. I do suggest if you do let it sit to blow off, just incase any particulates landed on the paint. You don’t want to grind them in while removing One Step.


Thanks for sharing this...

This is something I'm always telling and stressing to others and that is - let this product fully dry before removing. It wipes off so e-a-s-y


And yes, you can easily apply to an entire car and then wipe-off. The last thing you want to do is wipe off before it dries and this is the same thing as applying.


I spoke with a guy over the phone last week, this would be one of the guys I taught a private class with in New York. I left a quart of BF One Step with the shop, the technician told me he was now using the One Step for everything, as in everything. A compound, a polish and a wax. He loves the cut and finish and of course the wipe-off. I too have used it like a compound, that is used it to CUT HARD and then followed with it to polish and wax simply by changing pads.


A lot more fun to use than compound.


:)

MAXBKS
04-08-2019, 12:23 PM
Thanks for sharing this...

This is something I'm always telling and stressing to others and that is - let this product fully dry before removing. It wipes off so e-a-s-y


And yes, you can easily apply to an entire car and then wipe-off. The last thing you want to do is wipe off before it dries and this is the same thing as applying.


I spoke with a guy over the phone last week, this would be one of the guys I taught a private class with in New York. I left a quart of BF One Step with the shop, the technician told me he was now using the One Step for everything, as in everything. A compound, a polish and a wax. He loves the cut and finish and of course the wipe-off. I too have used it like a compound, that is used it to CUT HARD and then followed with it to polish and wax simply by changing pads.


A lot more fun to use than compound.


:)


So, if a LC white pad didn't get the results that you might be seeking you can buff with an orange pad and then follow it with a buffing of the white pad? Would you buff an entire panel with orange pad then move onto white pad without wiping off product. Could you explain the process in more detail. Got BF one step that should be here today and want to do daughters honda civic that has lived a neglected life. Thanks for any and all replys, Max

Hope this adds to original thread and is not hijacking it.

Maxreed241
04-08-2019, 06:44 PM
No matter what AIO I use, (usually HD speed) I always let it set on the paint (or glass) to give it the best chance to bond to the surface.

Sent from my Galaxy Note 9 using Autogeekonline mobile app

Dr Oldz
04-09-2019, 02:07 AM
So, if a LC white pad didn't get the results that you might be seeking you can buff with an orange pad and then follow it with a buffing of the white pad? Would you buff an entire panel with orange pad then move onto white pad without wiping off product. Could you explain the process in more detail. Got BF one step that should be here today and want to do daughters honda civic that has lived a neglected life. Thanks for any and all replys, Max

Hope this adds to original thread and is not hijacking it.

I’m not Mike, but you can use a more aggressive pad with One Step then use a less aggressive pad for finishing.

I would HIGHLY suggest wiping it off between steps. Remember when you buff paint with an abrasive liquid such as One Step, you are removing paint thus suspending the abraided away particles in the remaining buffing liquid. These particles (over time) can cause unwanted marring and a less than desired finish. So simply wipe off between steps if this how you chose to use this product. In this situation, wiping away the residue wet is fine on the first step. It’s the last step that it should be drying and allowed to bond to paint.

MAXBKS
04-09-2019, 09:22 AM
Thanks for the reply Dr Oldz. Using it as a two step is not the way I would like to use it. Just wondering if white pads results were not up to snuff and felt like I needed a little more cut how to go about it. Mike had said in another thread that using orange pad could leave marring.
Sounds like great product and am anxious to try it. Again thanks, Max

Dr Oldz
04-09-2019, 09:50 AM
Thanks for the reply Dr Oldz. Using it as a two step is not the way I would like to use it. Just wondering if white pads results were not up to snuff and felt like I needed a little more cut how to go about it. Mike had said in another thread that using orange pad could leave marring.
Sounds like great product and am anxious to try it. Again thanks, Max


Don’t overthink it too much. Remember what this product is designed to do: a One Step product that cleans, polishes and protects paint in one step. It’s not going to give 100% correction on all types of defects. What it does offer is some of the best cut, finishing capabilities and protection compared to other products in its class.

95% of the time a white polishing pad provides superior results for me!

Mike Phillips
04-09-2019, 03:22 PM
So, if a LC white pad didn't get the results that you might be seeking you can buff with an orange pad and then follow it with a buffing of the white pad?




Start by doing a Test Spot. See which pad gives you the best results but for correction and final results.

No on is ever "so good" they don't need to do a Test Spot if they are working on a car they have never worked on before.


Different brands of foam "cutting" and foam "polishing" can be very different. Heck even inside the same brand foam cutting and foam polishing pads can be very different. For example the blue Lake Country HDO don't feel sharp at all, (to me), at least not as sharp as the Lake Country orange Force Hybrid.

So test.

IF you find in order to get the results you want using a foam cutting pad but you see micro-marring from the pad, then "yes" you would want to remove the mico-marring using a softer pad OR spend more time with a polishing pad in the first place. There's a million ways to skin a cat. (No harm intended PETA), just a saying.






Would you buff an entire panel with orange pad then move onto white pad without wiping off product.



I would never do that but in my life and in my how-to books and classes I teach the practice of,

Work Clean

That residue on the paint will be,


Spent product
Removed paint



I would NOT grind that back into the paint I would wipe it off the car. Same idea as cleaning your pad with a nylon brush once in a while, remove the gunk off the face of the pad before applying more/fresh product.

Putting fresh product on a pad with a build-up of product pollutes and dilutes the fresh product. It's working dirty or backwards. Remember - clearcoat paints are scratch-sensitive. You'll see marring in dark colors but not always light colors but that doesn't mean it's not happening it's just the human eye cannot always see everything.





Could you explain the process in more detail. Got BF one step that should be here today and want to do daughters honda civic that has lived a neglected life. Thanks for any and all replys, Max

Hope this adds to original thread and is not hijacking it.




Wash and dry car
Inspect to see if it needs to be clayed - if so clay the paint and the glass
Do a Test Spot on a horizontal panel you can look down on and inspect.



If results from test spot look GREAT then repeat the process over the rest of the car. If something doesn't look right then post back here.


Change pads as often as your budget allows.

Dry pads always work better then wet soggy pads.


:)

WRAPT C5Z06
04-09-2019, 10:19 PM
I think megs D166 has the easiest wipe off of any AIO Iíve tried. Too bad the finish leaves something to be desired on some paints.


Sent from my iPhone using Autogeekonline mobile app (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=87407)

Me Time
06-06-2019, 02:16 AM
How does this compare to McKee's 37 360 AIO?